Meditation

 

Daily Practice

 
 

Meditation is dedicated time set aside to take care of yourself, a practical and proven tool that brings Mindfulness into action. As you sit quietly with yourself (or walk or run) in meditation, you can create the opportunity to listen to your breath and quiet your mind, to begin to see yourself more clearly, free of judgment and old habits. Meditation can help you better understand your emotions, reactions, habits and emotional responses to others. Benefits of a consistent practice can include: a decrease in anxiety, reduction in stress, decrease in tension related pain, and greater energy, focus and happiness.

Through meditation, you will gain an ability to observe yourself in a new way that helps you in your relationships with others, in your relationship with  Borderline Disorder, and most importantly, in your relationship with yourself.

Meditation is a practice, and you will need practice to learn it and experience its sustained benefits. But it is really quite simple. Begin by simply letting the world fall away, listening to the quiet rhythms of your breath. Sit comfortable and straight. Use a chair if necessary, or a pillow for comfort. Be still, only moving if necessary. Let your breaths be smooth and even—this will help to quiet the mind. Some people count breaths to ten, and then begin again, or use a mantra, which is a word or sound repeated to aid in concentrating while meditating. You can find different meditation techniques and mantras online for beginners to see what works best for you. 

Most importantly, don’t cling to thoughts as they emerge. If you find yourself thinking, simply release the thought without judgment—watch your thoughts move through you like clouds in the sky. Notice them and release them. Remember this important Buddhist teaching in your practice, “If your compassion does not include yourself, it is incomplete.” Through the practice of mediation, you open yourself to greater clarity, mental and physical health, and inner peace. 

 

Sources cited:

  • Salters-Pedneault, PhD Kristalyn. “Can Mindfulness Meditation Help Borderline Personality Disorder?” Verywell, 14 Apr. 2017, www.verywellmind.com/mindfulness-meditation-for-living-with-bpd-425382.
  • Art of Living. “How to Meditate for Beginners - 30 Tips, Tricks and Tools.” Art of Living (United States), 2018, www.artofliving.org/us-en/8-tips-get-started-meditation.